Fascinasians

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thepeopleofsingapore:

"Guys like me are pretty invisible. In some ways that’s a good thing and I’ve even had some guys say, ‘Why do you want to tell the world about us? Isn’t it better to just stay secret and pass?’ But it can be really isolating - to not know anyone like yourself who knows what you’re going through. The first time I met another transman in person, it was like a weight lifted off my shoulders. Trans women are a lot more visible, but there are actually many of us transmen in Singapore. So I’ve just decided to be out about it and I’m going to do a documentary about my transition.
I hope that by making this film and by being visible, that other transmen won’t feel as alone as I did. Nobody has done a documentary like this before - personal stories, peeks into our lives to show that we’re more than just our surgeries. So far the response has been amazing. Lots of people have offered support. But the thing that I feel best about are the emails I’m getting from all these guys saying how just knowing that I’m out there makes coping easier. It’s a real lifeline.
I understand that being out like this might have some personal cost, but acceptance will never happen unless some people are willing to put it on the line. And that’s what it means to ‘Man Up’, isn’t it? Taking responsibility and care for those around you, even if it’s not easy.”
Follow Chris and his project here: Some Reassembly Required

thepeopleofsingapore:

"Guys like me are pretty invisible. In some ways that’s a good thing and I’ve even had some guys say, ‘Why do you want to tell the world about us? Isn’t it better to just stay secret and pass?’ But it can be really isolating - to not know anyone like yourself who knows what you’re going through. The first time I met another transman in person, it was like a weight lifted off my shoulders. Trans women are a lot more visible, but there are actually many of us transmen in Singapore. So I’ve just decided to be out about it and I’m going to do a documentary about my transition.

I hope that by making this film and by being visible, that other transmen won’t feel as alone as I did. Nobody has done a documentary like this before - personal stories, peeks into our lives to show that we’re more than just our surgeries. So far the response has been amazing. Lots of people have offered support. But the thing that I feel best about are the emails I’m getting from all these guys saying how just knowing that I’m out there makes coping easier. It’s a real lifeline.

I understand that being out like this might have some personal cost, but acceptance will never happen unless some people are willing to put it on the line. And that’s what it means to ‘Man Up’, isn’t it? Taking responsibility and care for those around you, even if it’s not easy.”

Follow Chris and his project here: Some Reassembly Required

Awesome conversation tonight about Asian American feminism with Jenn of Reappropriate

The link to the podcast will be up tomorrow, check http://reappropriate.co/?p=6571 for updates. The next coversation will be on September 8th with Cayden Mak of 18mr on whether or not digital activism and hashtag activism is “real” activism!

Thanks to vteck for the screenshots ;)

When Gap changed its Twitter background to the picture of Sikh model Waris Ahluwalia, many commentators claimed a victory not only for social media, but for South Asians and Muslims as well. One blogger claimed the change was “to show solidarity and support” with those who were offended by the racist graffiti. But if solidarity simply means changing a Twitter background, then we have not only failed in some fundamental way in understanding the politics of that term, but we have also relegated our identity to merely that of a consumer. Gap has purposefully chosen to demonstrate solidarity with its brown consumers, but not with its brown factory workers. We have compromised our sense of racial solidarity for consumer solidarity, a solidarity between a corporation and its consumers that invites a racialized minority community to become rightful customers. Yet this image of inclusivity means little when the actual practices of the company continue to exclude Bangladeshi workers from having basic human rights. Changing a Twitter background is easy. Seeing through the smoke and mirrors, organizing to put pressure on Gap and policymakers, and demanding better working conditions for sweatshop laborers in Bangladesh–that is hard work.

-

Rethinking That Gap Ad That Went Viral: South Asian Consumers and Laborers (via medhanena)

(Source: rs620)

What is #AAPI feminism? Discussing tonight on Ep #5 of Reappropriate: The Podcast!

Join me and Reappropriate tonight at 9pm EST/6pm PST as we talk about #AAPI feminism, what Asian American feminism means, and what it’s like to be a voice for AAPI feminism online!

The podcast will start recording at 9pm EST / 6pm PST tonight through this link and you are invited to live-stream the episode as we record! As always, the podcast encourages user discussion. Please submit your questions and comments either before the recording through Twitter to @reappropriate, or during the recording both through Twitter or on the Google+ Hangout.

Earlier episodes of Reappropriate: the Podcast can be found on YouTube, or by subscribing through the iTunes Store.

ADVANCING JUSTICE CONFERENCE IS COMING UP!


Our team has been working hard to bring you great plenaries and workshops so you can help us build our movement nationwide. As you will see on our website, 



our plenaries and workshops provide Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders the opportunity to strategize and mobilize so we can have a lasting impact on all the issues we care about. You’ll find workshops on a range of issues, including on critical policy issues like immigration, voting rights, economic security, as well as helpful information on capacity building, and organizing and movement building. 


Check out what we have to offer and help us spread the word. Tweet about our workshops using #AJC2014 and follow us at @JustConf. Thanks for your support and help to make this the most successful conference yet!

The Advancing Justice Conference is the largest national conference focusing on civil and social justice issues impacting Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Advancing Justice began the conference six years ago to provide a meeting forum where the AAPI community and our allies can strategize and mobilize to make lasting impact on the issues we care about. Each year, our conference showcases the leading voices in the AAPI and racial justice movement. Speakers have included: Kiran Ahuja, the Honorable Denny Chin, Rep. Judy Chu, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Honda, Harold Koh, Norman Y. Mineta, Tom Perez, Ai-jen Poo, Gautam Raghavan, Jose Antonio Vargas, Angry Asian Man’s Phil Yu, and many more leaders from the government, the civil rights movement and the media. Whether you are a student, an activist, or just interested in a more equal America,register today. Students are eligible for a special registration rate of $120. And if they’re willing to volunteer, they can get $60 of that refunded after the conference. I’m putting together the volunteer info now, but in the meantime, folks who are interested in volunteering should contact me directly at metcubanez@advancingjustice-aajc.org.

ADVANCING JUSTICE CONFERENCE IS COMING UP!

Our team has been working hard to bring you great plenaries and workshops so you can help us build our movement nationwide. As you will see on our website, 

our plenaries and workshops provide Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders the opportunity to strategize and mobilize so we can have a lasting impact on all the issues we care about. You’ll find workshops on a range of issues, including on critical policy issues like immigration, voting rights, economic security, as well as helpful information on capacity building, and organizing and movement building. 

Check out what we have to offer and help us spread the word. Tweet about our workshops using #AJC2014 and follow us at @JustConf. Thanks for your support and help to make this the most successful conference yet!

The Advancing Justice Conference is the largest national conference focusing on civil and social justice issues impacting Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Advancing Justice began the conference six years ago to provide a meeting forum where the AAPI community and our allies can strategize and mobilize to make lasting impact on the issues we care about. 

Each year, our conference showcases the leading voices in the AAPI and racial justice movement. Speakers have included: Kiran Ahuja, the Honorable Denny Chin, Rep. Judy Chu, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Honda, Harold Koh, Norman Y. Mineta, Tom Perez, Ai-jen Poo, Gautam Raghavan, Jose Antonio Vargas, Angry Asian Man’s Phil Yu, and many more leaders from the government, the civil rights movement and the media. 

Whether you are a student, an activist, or just interested in a more equal America,register todayStudents are eligible for a special registration rate of $120. And if they’re willing to volunteer, they can get $60 of that refunded after the conference. I’m putting together the volunteer info now, but in the meantime, folks who are interested in volunteering should contact me directly at metcubanez@advancingjustice-aajc.org.

If Asian men are the vassals for white men’s domination fantasies, black men are the tools required for white male submissive fantasies. As Frantz Fanon explains, the black ‘man’ no longer exists in the white sexual imagination. Instead, ‘one is no longer aware of the negro, but only of a penis. The Negro is eclipsed. He is turned into a penis. He is a penis.’ Rather than existing as individuals, black men exist as sexual tools, ready to fulfill, or violate, white male sexual fetishes.

- Chong-suk Han, They Don’t Want To Cruise Your Type: Gay Men of Color and the Racial Politics of Exclusion (via rniguelangel)

18mr:

Hey Jimmy Tayoun, deliberately writing out slurs isn’t “just a mistake”! Tayoun, the publisher of the Philadelphia Public Record, tried to shrug off this racist caption after community groups and City Councilman Mark Squilla called out the paper for its “humor”.http://bit.ly/1vjyYoq
-JS

18mr:

Hey Jimmy Tayoun, deliberately writing out slurs isn’t “just a mistake”! Tayoun, the publisher of the Philadelphia Public Record, tried to shrug off this racist caption after community groups and City Councilman Mark Squilla called out the paper for its “humor”.

http://bit.ly/1vjyYoq

-JS

William Bratton: Investigate Ryo Oyamada's Death

jspark3000:

image

Ryo Oyamada, a 24 year old student from Japan, was struck and killed by an NYPD vehicle in a hit & run.  Witnesses say the police car had no lights or sirens on and was going over 70 mph.  The released footage by NYPD was proven to be heavily altered in a cover-up, showing “lights” on the vehicle, when compared to footage from the NY Housing Authority on the same street with the same timestamp. 

On a personal note: I know that this will probably not be shared or reblogged very much, because Asians are not very prominent in American culture.  I understand this, because Asians (like me) are partially at fault for being so passive.  But I am begging you to please consider signing this petition out of human decency.  Ryo was just a student walking home, then struck by a nearly silent police cruiser going at excess speed, and the NYPD covered it up. 

Here is the side-by-side comparison of the released video footage, including updates from the case.  *Edit*  This article contains a link to a graphic video moments after the crash, showing the body of Ryo Oyamada and NY citizens yelling at the police.  Please advise, it is highly disturbing. 

And the following is an excerpt from the petition, which as of now only has 286 signatures.

thebriskconvergence:

Amazing.

Lifted from:

hbcreative:

#FERGUSON

     I won’t soon forget the events that took place in #ferguson…will you?

lightstraumarevelation:

Our tour is from August 26-Sept 7th. Hitting NYC, Detroit, Chicago, St. Paul, Madison, Seattle by the end of August and beginning from Aug 26-Sept 7th!  For an in progress list of events click here.

"Inspired by the directorial cue—”Lights, camera, action!”—award-winning poets Cathy Linh Che ( cathylinhche ) , Jess X Chen ( jessxchen ) and Paul Tran ( iampaultran ) embark on a cross-country extravaganza to read from their first and upcoming books. From New York City to Seattle, these fearless poets combine the ferocity of oral history, spoken word, and Asian American poetics to extricate new narratives of trauma, exile, colonialism, and love in the aftermath of war. Their poems turn from anger to sorrow, mercy to compassion, the erotic to the crowning of one’s own life. Nothing is spared or unexamined. Here is a desire to witness and write it all.”

Poster & Photography by Jess X Chen, with assistance from Paul Tran and Cathy Linh Che

The event for our NYC Kick off show is here.