Fascinasians

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Oct 1
18mr:

Led by Yeb Sano, climate change advocates will walk for 40 days from Manila to Tacloban in the Philippines! #ClimateWalk http://bit.ly/1vyDLRT-JS

18mr:

Led by Yeb Sano, climate change advocates will walk for 40 days from Manila to Tacloban in the Philippines! #ClimateWalk 


http://bit.ly/1vyDLRT-JS

aljazeeraamerica:

Hong Kong’s people want full decolonization

FULL GALLERY

Join Us for a Talk on Interracial Relationships!

Asian Tinychat Assemble!
rubato lightspeedsound reallifedocumentarian fortunatelight

The Great John Cho on the challenges of being an Asian American actor

leeandlow:

"Just from a creative standpoint there are just entire genres that I’m locked out of, being Asian, because of historical reality. You know, like the cowboy picture (laughs). Basically you’re doing immigrants, smaller immigrant roles. And if you’re doing bigger roles, you’re doing modern tales. That is to say, contemporary stories. And you can do futuristic stories. So I guess I’ve done those.

image

What I’m locked out of is American history. There just aren’t roles written for Asians in stories that revolve around American history. So you’re dealing with that handicap off the bat.

I don’t know whether the perception is that people think I’ve got it made in the shade, but I still feel like I have to fight for everything. And you know, my career may seem rosy to some—to me, I’m always pretty convinced the wheels are gonna fall off the car any day and  that this is the last job. It seems impossible that I’ll work again every time—but maybe I’m fooling my own self. Maybe that’s not the truth either.

I have noticed that—for whatever reason—my personality, I think, folds over into what people consider to be a broad definition of American. And I think that I’m very Korean-specific. But that’s just a chance thing. You know, I feel very much like a Korean man that immigrated to the United States. But I think white America would see me as American. That’s a vague adjective in lot of ways—but it’s a bit of a roll of the dice as to whether people see you as foreign or not. The number of years you’ve been in the United States, whether you’re born here or not—sometimes has no bearing on whether people see you as American or not.”

Full interview (and you should read it!) here.

Never forget
When your classmates wrinkled their noses at the scent of your lunch still lingering on your clothes,
Even though their ancestors had conquered half the world in search of the spices you ate.

Never forget
How they jeered at your mother’s bindi, making crude jokes about how ridiculous it looked on her,
And after ten years, how they all wore the exact same ornament on their own foreheads to keep up with the current trends.

Never forget
When they repeatedly stumbled over the sharp letters which formed your name, forcing you to repeat yourself several times before giving up;
Only to have those very letters tattooed on their own flesh, in a language they do not comprehend.

Always remember
Your culture belongs to you,
Not to them.

- Muneeb Hasan [08.10.14] (via muneebb)

Calling Seattle Asian Pacific American teens who are interested in art, history, and the ways they intersect! 
YouthCAN is the Wing Luke Museum’s award-winning arts and leadership program for Asian Pacific American youth ages 15-19. 
YouthCAN works to connect APA youth to their heritage, help them explore their identities as informed by social/political issues, and involve them in their community through hands-on art projects, developed and led by mentor artists. 
Youth create artwork and curate their own exhibitions for the Wing’s Frank Fujii Gallery.
YouthCAN meets on Wednesday and Fridays from 3:30-5 pm during the school year.
The program is always free.
To learn more, visit http://www.wingluke.org/youthcan. 

Calling Seattle Asian Pacific American teens who are interested in art, history, and the ways they intersect! 

YouthCAN is the Wing Luke Museum’s award-winning arts and leadership program for Asian Pacific American youth ages 15-19.

YouthCAN works to connect APA youth to their heritage, help them explore their identities as informed by social/political issues, and involve them in their community through hands-on art projects, developed and led by mentor artists.

Youth create artwork and curate their own exhibitions for the Wing’s Frank Fujii Gallery.

YouthCAN meets on Wednesday and Fridays from 3:30-5 pm during the school year.

The program is always free.

To learn more, visit http://www.wingluke.org/youthcan. 

do you think AsAm men mistake fetishism for admiration after continuous emasculation in media?

Anonymous

Yes.

hi Fascinasians, do you have any advice or posts written about your experience growing up in Arizona and surviving as an AsAm woman?

Anonymous

I actually haven’t written anything! It’s probably because when I was living in Arizona, I internalized a lot of racism and sexism. I kind of “survived” by assimilating and making self-deprecating jokes about my Asian heritage. Sorry that doesn’t help much!

Plate By Plate - New York

Thanks to some very lovely people from Project By Project - Los Angeles, I was able to attend the 2014 Annual Tasting Benefit put on by Project By Project - New York!

Plate By Plate is part of an organization called Project by Project (PbP), a national volunteer organization. PbP works with a partner community organization to customize each campaign according to their needs. 100% of proceeds raised are given to the partner organization, resume-writing workshops, tutorials for immigrant children, and parent-child activities to enhance community connectedness. Every year, PbP selects a theme and a local partner to exchange knowledge, education, and skills with.

This year, PbP - NY worked with the Henry Street Settlement, a landmark organization in New York providing multicultural services and resources for mental health issues in New York. Its bilingual program helps the growing Asian American population of NYC and helps provide job opportunities, skills workshops, and arts development.

The tasting was held in a beautiful venue in Chelsea, the Metropolitan Pavilion. The dim lights and energetic music set the stage for a glitzy night of wining and dining.

As soon as I got there, MC Jin went on stage to talk about the importance of the Asian American community and how honored he was to be a part of it. “I felt instantly aged. Someone came up to me and was like, dude I’ve been listening to your music since the 8th grade!” we love you always, Jin.

Many of the restaurants featured gourmet and modern takes on Asian cuisine, with Mok Bar doing a minimalist take of ddeokbeokki. The bacon and gochujang was a surprising (but super delicious) combination that I’m reminiscing about even now.

Local favorite Fung Tu served a chilled corn soup (I had three servings)

Taiwanese Shaved Ice from Wooly’s Ice

The winners of the golden plate were Vai Restaurant and Barrow’s Intense Ginger Liqueur! The line for Vai was so long, it almost wrapped around the auction table. Congratulations! 

The night concluded with an after party held at Gansevoort Park, my favorite rooftop and view of the Empire State Building.

Project By Project continues to be one of the most respected and admirable organizations in the community. Their ability to create leaders, fund raise consciously, and build bridges is unrivaled and I’m very grateful to have met so many PbP folks. To volunteer or apply for a committee, check out their website!

See you next year, PbP. 

Tear gas may have the immediate effect of dispersing the peaceful demonstrators, but if you make people cry, and the tears are from their heart, how can you govern?

-

Alan Leong, leader of the Civic Party

Keep up with what’s going on in Hong Kong here

(via 18mr)