Fascinasians

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I think when these Asian American cyberactivists drop sound bite rhetoric like “all of you are anti-Black,” I’m just going to ask them exactly what they mean. I want them to use specific historical examples, I want them to explain their framework, I’m going to ask if they even think about how often the Asian people with the *least* amount of privilege are rendered invisible and silenced by their rhetoric. I’m going to demand that they work as hard as the rest of us do when we bring up difficult subjects, because right now, they don’t. They drop these phrases in an attempt to shame those of us on the Asian left who, you know, think it’s important that cross-community alliance and transformation happens between communities, not self-righteous individuals seeking a pat on the back for being the most down for the cause exceptional Asian.

- bao phi (via rockstarchinaman)

papershopprojects:

Nisei Week Grand Parade
August 10, 2014
Little Tokyo, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.

Ippee nifwee deebiru [thank you very much] to the 60 volunteers who represented the Okinawa Association of America (OAA) at this year’s parade! We had 27 dancers and 33 banner/flag carriers and supporters. The dancers performed “Asadoya Yunta” (choreographed by Yonamine Keiko-sensei) and “Ohto Kugani” (choreographed by Miyago Nosho-sensei) along the parade route, which started at 2nd Street (at Central Avenue), turned right onto South San Pedro Street, right onto East 1st Street, and ended on Central Avenue between 1st and 2nd.

More pictures will be added here and I’m [slowly] working on the videos (click here to watch my video from their last parade performance).

Click here to learn more about Nisei Week
Click here to learn more about the Okinawa Association of America

Photos by Ben Higa (group) and Eric Takushi (dancers)

The “Asian accent” tells the story of Chinese-American assimilation in a nutshell. Our parents have the accent that white Americans perceive as the most foreign out of all the possible alternatives, so our choice is to have no accent at all. The accent of our parents is the accent of the grimy streets of Chinatown with its mahjong parlors and fried food stalls and counterfeit jewelry, so we work to wipe away all traces of that world from our speech so we can settle comfortably into our roles as respectable middle-class doctors, lawyers, engineers, hundreds of miles from Chinatown.

No wonder we react so viscerally to the “ching-chong, ching-chong” schoolyard taunt. To attack our language, our ability to sound “normal,” is to attack our ability to be normal. It’s to attack everything we’ve worked for.

And make no mistake about it — to sound like a “normal” American is to wield privilege.

- Breaking Out The Broken English : Code Switch : NPR (via cmao)

leseanthomas:

" People ask ’ So, how are the roles now? You must be getting so many.’ And it’s like, I don’t know if you know, but I’m Asian still. It’s not a complaint, that’s just how it is now, and I have to forge my own path through it and see that through. I think that if I had not been Asian, I probably would have a whole plethora of roles, at least to audition for, but it’s just not what has been written.” - Steven Yeun When all else fails, gotta roll up your sleeves and do it, to it.
Source: http://www.projectcasting.com/news/walking-dead-actor-struggling-to-find-other-roles/

leseanthomas:

" People ask ’ So, how are the roles now? You must be getting so many.’ And it’s like, I don’t know if you know, but I’m Asian still. It’s not a complaint, that’s just how it is now, and I have to forge my own path through it and see that through. I think that if I had not been Asian, I probably would have a whole plethora of roles, at least to audition for, but it’s just not what has been written.” - Steven Yeun 

When all else fails, gotta roll up your sleeves and do it, to it.

Source: http://www.projectcasting.com/news/walking-dead-actor-struggling-to-find-other-roles/

commovente:

aaww-nyc:

aaww-nyc:

Mouth to Mouth is AAWW’s open mic series. We provide a safe space to forge new art and communities. We’ve seen unpublished writers and legendary authors, sparked book deals, and hosted comedy, spoken word, music, poetry, memoir, fiction, and more.
DarkMatter is a queer South Asian performance and literary arts duo made up of Alok Vaid-Menon and Janani Balasubramanian. They make noise, perform spoken word, write excessively, facilitate workshops, and flail their arms around. 
Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:00pm
Asian American Writers’ Workshop
112 W 27th St 6th Floor
New York,
RESERVE A SPACE

Y’ALL GONNA B THERE??

all you kids in nyc go to this for me. darkmatter is the bomb and the aaww is one of my favorite families. go! go go.

commovente:

aaww-nyc:

aaww-nyc:

Mouth to Mouth is AAWW’s open mic series. We provide a safe space to forge new art and communities. We’ve seen unpublished writers and legendary authors, sparked book deals, and hosted comedy, spoken word, music, poetry, memoir, fiction, and more.

DarkMatter is a queer South Asian performance and literary arts duo made up of Alok Vaid-Menon and Janani Balasubramanian. They make noise, perform spoken word, write excessively, facilitate workshops, and flail their arms around. 

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:00pm

Asian American Writers’ Workshop
112 W 27th St 6th Floor
New York,

RESERVE A SPACE

Y’ALL GONNA B THERE??

all you kids in nyc go to this for me. darkmatter is the bomb and the aaww is one of my favorite families. go! go go.

pag-asaharibon:

Here’s a photo by Dr. Kevin Nadal of the book sale 2014 Filipino National Historical Society Conference at San Diego. Most of the Arcadia Publishing books are authored by chapters of the Filipino American National Historical Society. 

Los Angeles’s Historic Filipinotown
Filipinos in Carson and the South Bay
Filipinos in Chicago
Filipinos in Hawai’i
Filipinos in Hollywood
Filipinos in Los Angeles
Filipinos in Puget Sound
Filipinos in San Diego
Filipinos in San Francisco
Filipinos in Stockton
Filipinos in the East Bay
Filipinos in the Willamette Valley
Filipinos in Vallejo
Filipinos in Ventura County
Filipinos in Washington, D.C.

Nadal adds in his tweet on the upcoming Filipinos in New York City and I would imagine there will be one of Filipinos in Virginia too.

pag-asaharibon:

Here’s a photo by Dr. Kevin Nadal of the book sale 2014 Filipino National Historical Society Conference at San Diego. Most of the Arcadia Publishing books are authored by chapters of the Filipino American National Historical Society

I am sick and tired of reassuring myself that if their smiling faces can rejoice at the murderer’s freedom simply because the victim didn’t belong here, that I have any hope of belonging here either.

I am not an American. This is not my country. I have no country other than a China I barely know and do not love. Trayvon had no country other than the vanished West African kingdoms of centuries ago, replaced by post-colonial polities that know nothing of and care nothing for their long-lost sons and daughters of the Middle Passage.

- Arthur Chu, @thedailybeastpress: "Men Without a Country: Mike Brown, Trayvon Martin, My Father, and Me"  (via thephantomcatalyst)

To all youth in NYC, check out Chinatown Beautification Day’s Youth Conference: Breaking Barriers this Sunday, August 17. Registration begins at 9:30 AM at the Asian American/Asian Research Institute, 18th Floor, 25 W 43rd Street. 

This year’s conference will feature keynote speaker will be Juliet Shen, activist and feminist as well as founder and writer of Fascinasians. Youth conference also offers a series of workshops with topics ranging from police violence to spoken word poetry to the changing NYC specialized high school system to immigration to gentrification to Asian American masculinity and more! 

CBD youth conference is open to both high school and college students. Registration is free and copious amounts of dumplings and snacks will be provided throughout the day! Space is limited and fills up quickly, so register soon at http://cbd14.com/register_conference.

Youth conference is a great way to meet new people, partake in a series of thought provoking workshops, and connect with the youth activist community in NYC. If you have any questions, please feel free to email Ivy Pan at ivypan94@gmail.com.

For more information…
Website: http://cbd14.com/conference
Fb: https://www.facebook.com/events/707026146033967/
Media coverage of cleanup day this past Saturday:http://video.sinovision.net/?id=23510

Silence is Not an Option

roxanegay:

Another young black man has been gunned down. His name was Mike Brown. He was unarmed.

My [redacted] e-mailed me because she knew I would be upset about this story, because she knows all of my heart, and all I could say in response was, “I am numb.” 

I don’t care if Mike Brown was going to college soon. This should not matter. We should not have to prove Mike Brown was worthy of living. We should not have to account for the ways in which he is suitably respectable. We should not have to prove that his body did not deserve to be riddled with bullets. His community should not have to silence their anger so they won’t be accused of rioting, so they won’t become targets too.  

It should not matter if Mike Brown was a good boy but I have no doubt that he was. His life mattered, no matter how he chose to live it. He had family and friends who must mourn him and who must now worry about who will be murdered next. Every life matters. There are few things I believe more passionately. Unfortunately, we live in a country where your worth and safety are largely determined by the color of your skin. 

Yesterday, a young black man was murdered in Ferguson, Missouri. Every day, this happens. This is the value of black life. We are targets. Our children are targets. This is the scarred reality in which we must raise our children.

The media, as usual, has no idea how to talk about Mike Brown’s murder ethically. They do not know how to talk about his community’s grief and anger ethically. They do not know how to overcome the profound cultural biases that have shaped how they understand the value of black lives or the tenor of black anger and grief. 

Yesterday, NASCAR driver Tony Stewart hit and killed Kevin Ward Jr. with his car during a sprint race on a dirt track. Not much of that sentence makes sense to me because I don’t really follow car racing but I have been struck by the story and how clearly the proper language has been used to describe what took place. One man killed another with his car. It is a tragedy. Did Kevin Ward Jr. go to college? That will never be part of his narrative because we inherently assume his life matters. He is white.

There is no comparing Mike Brown and Kevin Ward Jr. not really, but I am still keenly aware of the differences in how their deaths have been reported. I am keenly aware of how deftly responsibility has been placed squarely on the responsible party in Kevin Ward Jr.’s death. The police officer who murdered Mike Brown is on “paid administrative leave,” while an investigation is conducted. This is what always happens. An unarmed young black man is shot multiple times and his murderer is given the compensated benefit of the doubt. 

As we try to make sense of this latest tragedy and as we try to prepare for the next one, and there will, certainly be a next one and one after that for the whole of our lives, I think about how we rally and how we try to express our solidarity. We are. We are. We are. 

But. 

We are not Mike Brown. We are not Eric Garner. We are not Renisha McBride. We are not Trayvon Martin. I understand the sentiment behind these cries of solidarity but we are not these men and women who have been murdered in different but similar ways for the exact same reason. I worry that we diminish their lives, their deaths, and the grief of those who loved them when we think we can simply say we are those who have been so cruelly lost.

We are not these people. 

Maybe it is better for those of us with brown skin to say we might someday endure a fate like the one suffered by Mike Brown, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, and countless others. Maybe it is better for those of us who could never possibly endure such a fate to say, “We will never know what it is like to live with such danger in a seemingly safe place.” These statements aren’t as catchy as “We are,” but they are more accurate. 

What on earth is there to say at this point? Outrage has done nothing. Protest has done nothing. Grief has done nothing. Doing or saying nothing is not an option, and yet.

Aug 7

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