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74-year-old restaurant owner brutally beaten and robbed

Yong Kim, owner of Mary’s Fabulous Chicken and Fish, was leaving the restaurant and walking his to his car when someone attacked him from behind, knocking him to the ground and beating him in the head, neck and face. The suspect then took Kim’s wallet and ran away.

Kim suffered several large gashes on his head, extensive swelling and bruising on his face and neck. His glasses and dentures were also broken during the attack. 

An unknown person attacked Yong Kim, the owner of Mary’s Fabulous Chicken and Fish at 3220 Packard Road, from behind as Kim walked to his car around 9:55 p.m. Tuesday.

Doo Kim said her husband did not see anyone around before the attack took place.

He was closing the restaurant alone when the attack occurred.

Doo Kim said her husband did not know anyone was behind the restaurant.

"They didn’t say nothing," she said. "They just started beating."


Thankfully, Kim didn’t suffer any brain injuries in the attack, and has been moved out of intensive care.

Anyone with information about the incident is encouraged to call the Ann Arbor police anonymous tip line at 734-794-6939 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAK UP (773-2587).

via Angry Asian Man

"No Angels" is a song about pornography. Sex. Lust. And learning to love.

READ LYRICS/DOWNLOAD MP3: http://grandmaster.bandcamp.com/track…

Words // jason chu
Director // Jason Poon
Actress // Michelle Talley
Hair & Makeup // Beaute by Frankie
Casting Assistant // Tiffany Chu

Music // Christopher “Claudeo” Changchien
Singer // Vivian Chen

Thanks to // Rachel Moy, Cindy Lu

BOOKING, BUSINESS, PRESS INQUIRIES: http://jasonchumusic.com/booking

There’s been a dangerous sentiment by national press that Asian folks in the U.S. do not stand with Ferguson. Media has falsely perpetuated myths and misconceptions about Asian Americans and have formed inaccurate stories.

Looting stories of Asian Markets in St. Louis vilifying black men. Stories that stereotype all Asian Americans as the “model” minority. That all Asian Americans are geniuses, work hard, are great at math, and dominate universities. That if Asian Americans can achieve the American dream, why can’t other minorities?

Statistics and facts can be backed up by reports and data by the Census, government agencies, non-profit organizations*. “Good” and “Bad” stereotypes are merely fantasy, yet can be dangerously manipulated.

As a self-identified Asian American and Southeast Asian man, I stand firmly against false generalizations and speak upon my own experiences.

I created this video to show that just like in the past, today, there are Asian American allies to social justice and humanitarian causes.
I strongly support the people of Ferguson. May Michael Brown and the countless men dying in our American streets Rest In Power.

-

Kenny K. Hoang,

*For more information: Check out APIASF’s most recent “Care Report” and AAJC’s “A Community of Contrast”

Awesome conversation tonight about Asian American feminism with Jenn of Reappropriate

The link to the podcast will be up tomorrow, check http://reappropriate.co/?p=6571 for updates. The next coversation will be on September 8th with Cayden Mak of 18mr on whether or not digital activism and hashtag activism is “real” activism!

Thanks to vteck for the screenshots ;)

What is #AAPI feminism? Discussing tonight on Ep #5 of Reappropriate: The Podcast!

Join me and Reappropriate tonight at 9pm EST/6pm PST as we talk about #AAPI feminism, what Asian American feminism means, and what it’s like to be a voice for AAPI feminism online!

The podcast will start recording at 9pm EST / 6pm PST tonight through this link and you are invited to live-stream the episode as we record! As always, the podcast encourages user discussion. Please submit your questions and comments either before the recording through Twitter to @reappropriate, or during the recording both through Twitter or on the Google+ Hangout.

Earlier episodes of Reappropriate: the Podcast can be found on YouTube, or by subscribing through the iTunes Store.

ADVANCING JUSTICE CONFERENCE IS COMING UP!


Our team has been working hard to bring you great plenaries and workshops so you can help us build our movement nationwide. As you will see on our website, 



our plenaries and workshops provide Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders the opportunity to strategize and mobilize so we can have a lasting impact on all the issues we care about. You’ll find workshops on a range of issues, including on critical policy issues like immigration, voting rights, economic security, as well as helpful information on capacity building, and organizing and movement building. 


Check out what we have to offer and help us spread the word. Tweet about our workshops using #AJC2014 and follow us at @JustConf. Thanks for your support and help to make this the most successful conference yet!

The Advancing Justice Conference is the largest national conference focusing on civil and social justice issues impacting Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Advancing Justice began the conference six years ago to provide a meeting forum where the AAPI community and our allies can strategize and mobilize to make lasting impact on the issues we care about. Each year, our conference showcases the leading voices in the AAPI and racial justice movement. Speakers have included: Kiran Ahuja, the Honorable Denny Chin, Rep. Judy Chu, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Honda, Harold Koh, Norman Y. Mineta, Tom Perez, Ai-jen Poo, Gautam Raghavan, Jose Antonio Vargas, Angry Asian Man’s Phil Yu, and many more leaders from the government, the civil rights movement and the media. Whether you are a student, an activist, or just interested in a more equal America,register today. Students are eligible for a special registration rate of $120. And if they’re willing to volunteer, they can get $60 of that refunded after the conference. I’m putting together the volunteer info now, but in the meantime, folks who are interested in volunteering should contact me directly at metcubanez@advancingjustice-aajc.org.

ADVANCING JUSTICE CONFERENCE IS COMING UP!

Our team has been working hard to bring you great plenaries and workshops so you can help us build our movement nationwide. As you will see on our website, 

our plenaries and workshops provide Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders the opportunity to strategize and mobilize so we can have a lasting impact on all the issues we care about. You’ll find workshops on a range of issues, including on critical policy issues like immigration, voting rights, economic security, as well as helpful information on capacity building, and organizing and movement building. 

Check out what we have to offer and help us spread the word. Tweet about our workshops using #AJC2014 and follow us at @JustConf. Thanks for your support and help to make this the most successful conference yet!

The Advancing Justice Conference is the largest national conference focusing on civil and social justice issues impacting Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Advancing Justice began the conference six years ago to provide a meeting forum where the AAPI community and our allies can strategize and mobilize to make lasting impact on the issues we care about. 

Each year, our conference showcases the leading voices in the AAPI and racial justice movement. Speakers have included: Kiran Ahuja, the Honorable Denny Chin, Rep. Judy Chu, Sen. Dick Durbin, Rep. Mike Honda, Harold Koh, Norman Y. Mineta, Tom Perez, Ai-jen Poo, Gautam Raghavan, Jose Antonio Vargas, Angry Asian Man’s Phil Yu, and many more leaders from the government, the civil rights movement and the media. 

Whether you are a student, an activist, or just interested in a more equal America,register todayStudents are eligible for a special registration rate of $120. And if they’re willing to volunteer, they can get $60 of that refunded after the conference. I’m putting together the volunteer info now, but in the meantime, folks who are interested in volunteering should contact me directly at metcubanez@advancingjustice-aajc.org.

CAPITAL CAL Mini-Grant Program

Following Ferguson: Asian Americans Can Choose ‘Invisibility, Complicity, or Resistance’

Bitter Fruits: On Ferguson and the Ghosts of the Philippine-American War

Heavy read, but necessary read.

Why All Communities of Color Must Demand an End to Police Brutality

Ferguson Protestor

A man holds up a piece of police tape during a protest in Ferguson, Missouri, August 11, 2014 (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

The images out of Ferguson, Missouri, these past two weeks have been shocking: tear gas blanketing suburban streets, law enforcement creating a war zone and defiant protesters braving it all. But it is important to remember that what started Ferguson’s fight is far too common: the police killing of an unarmed black teen.

African-Americans are the primary targets of law-enforcement profiling and violence, as the killings of Oscar GrantSean BellJonathan Ferrell and Eric Garner all attest. But during this past week, LatinoAsian-AmericanArab-American and Muslim organizations have all released statements of solidarity informed by similar experiences with discriminatory law enforcement practices, as well as an urgency to collectively identify and implement solutions.

In fact, Latinos and Asian- and Arab-Americans have a critical stake in reforming discriminatory police practices. While African-Americans in Ferguson must remain the primary voices and decision-makers calling for action to address the murder of Michael Brown, other communities of color can and must join Ferguson’s fight by linking the impact of racially motivated policing with the structural racial inequities that exacerbate it.

Latinos and Asian and Arab-Americans are no strangers to police violence and profiling based on skin color, accent, language, immigration status and faith. For example, Fong Lee, the 19-year-old son of Laotian refugees, was shot and killed by a police officer as he was riding his bike home from school in Minneapolis in 2006. For years, Latinos, along with African-Americans, have been the disproportionate targets of the New York Police Department’s “stop-and-frisk” tactic. And Muslim, South Asian and Arab-American communities have experienced ongoingsurveillance in mosques and student associations, all in the name of national security.

In their ongoing war on undocumented immigration, federal and state law enforcement agencies have been accused of engaging in rampant profiling of Latino and Asian-American communities. Federal programs such as Secure Communities and “Show Me Your Papers” laws enacted in Arizona, Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina and Utah have led to stops and detentions of people based on their accents or skin color, and deepened both documented and undocumented immigrants’ fears of engaging with law enforcement.

When law enforcement trample on the rights of any group, we must all resist: the oppressive, militarized tactics on display in Ferguson have undermined people’s basic rights to peaceful assembly and movement, and it’s not the first time. For Asian-Americans, the curfew that caused so much unnecessary violence in Ferguson over the weekend was reminiscent of the “enemy alien curfews” that restricted the movements of Japanese-Americans, as well as German, Italian and Japanese noncitizens, during World War II—also imposed for reasons ostensibly related to public safety. The military-grade hardware we’ve seen on the streets of Ferguson has also been deployed by law enforcement in border cities in California, Texas and Arizona, where reports of racial profiling, harassment and deaths of Latinos seeking refuge in the United States have been occurring for decades now.

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How can we fight back against police brutality and profiling? To start with, we can push for concrete solutions already proposed by communities of color, such as requiring police to wear cameras, ensuring police accountability through the legal system, documenting police stops, ending racial and religious profiling, providing culturally and linguistically appropriate trainings for law enforcement that reflect the communities they serve, instituting diverse recruitment and hiring practices, and abiding by the concepts of community policing based on mutual trust and respect. Coalitions such as Communities United for Police Reform in New York City provide hopeful examples of how organizing black, brown and interfaith communities can lead tolegislative victories that maintain public safety, civil rights and police accountability.

But police brutality is just one symptom of this country’s larger structural racism, which segregates our schools and cities, increases the poverty and unemployment rates for people of color, has psychological consequences for families and young people, and decreases our life expectancy. African-Americans disproportionately bear the brunt of this structural racism, but it affects many immigrants and other minorities as well. In order to transform our communities, all people of color must find common cause in each other’s movements. We can only end racial injustice through strategic multiracial alliances at the local and national levels that are informed by an understanding of our connected histories, and through working within our constituencies to address anti-black racism and stereotypes about one another.

We can and must start with Ferguson.