The New York City Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following person reported missing within the confines of the 24 Precinct. The details are as follows:Missing: Lee, Jiwon 29 year old female 220 West 98 Street NY, NYThe missing was last seen at her residence on April 1, 2014 at approximately 2030 hours. She is described as being 5’2” tall, 120 lbs., with black hair and eyes.A photo of the missing is attached and available at DCPI.Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.All calls are strictly confidential. The New York City Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following person reported missing within the confines of the 24 Precinct. The details are as follows:Missing: Lee, Jiwon 29 year old female 220 West 98 Street NY, NYThe missing was last seen at her residence on April 1, 2014 at approximately 2030 hours. She is described as being 5’2” tall, 120 lbs., with black hair and eyes.A photo of the missing is attached and available at DCPI.Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.All calls are strictly confidential.

The New York City Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following person reported missing within the confines of the 24 Precinct. The details are as follows:

Missing: Lee, Jiwon 29 year old female 220 West 98 Street NY, NY

The missing was last seen at her residence on April 1, 2014 at approximately 2030 hours. She is described as being 5’2” tall, 120 lbs., with black hair and eyes.

A photo of the missing is attached and available at DCPI.

Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

All calls are strictly confidential.

Seriously, how awesome is Nate Shinagawa? You may remember him from 2012 when he was the Democratic candidate in the race for New York’s 23rd Congressional seat. I covered his race in an article for Hyphen Magazine, and though the Republican incumbent kept the seat, Nate hasn’t stopped moving forward. He remains one of the most well-liked members of Ithaca’s county legislature and has been pulling some very Cory-Booker-local-superhero stunts lately.
He and Ithaca’s mayor, Svante Myrick, went around shoveling peoples’ driveways during the giant snowstorm upstate New York got this week!
Send him some love, it’s cold out there!

Seriously, how awesome is Nate Shinagawa? You may remember him from 2012 when he was the Democratic candidate in the race for New York’s 23rd Congressional seat. I covered his race in an article for Hyphen Magazine, and though the Republican incumbent kept the seat, Nate hasn’t stopped moving forward. He remains one of the most well-liked members of Ithaca’s county legislature and has been pulling some very Cory-Booker-local-superhero stunts lately.

He and Ithaca’s mayor, Svante Myrick, went around shoveling peoples’ driveways during the giant snowstorm upstate New York got this week!

Send him some love, it’s cold out there!

The New York City Asian American Student Conference (NYCAASC) is honored to introduce our High School Liaison (HSL) Program. Every year, NYCAASC aims to empower high school students from the metropolitan NYC area by providing a space for activists and student leaders to engage in dialogue on racial, social, and political matters about Asian/Pacific/Americans.  


We are looking for talented and well-rounded high school students who are interested in participating in collegiate activism along with learning how a grassroots conference is organized through the HSL Program. Students will gain more knowledge on in Asian/Pacific/American issues, leadership, communication, networking, and professionalism. Furthermore, we will provide them with mentorship and guidance throughout their time in the program.


You can apply through the application form. If you know of any interested students for our program, please share this with them! They do not have to be ethnically Asian or Asian American to apply!  If you have any further questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to email our Associate Director at samantha.seid@nycaasc.com.


We invite you to join us as we commemorate Asian American culture, people, history, and our progressive future. The Asian Pacific American Conference (APAC) is a progressive cultural conference that embraces a pan-Asian identity and strives for inclusiveness, empowerment, and unity. This year, we will comprehensively examine a number of key issues in Asian America. We hope that through the workshops, speakers, and discussion at APAC 2014, an important conversation about the place of Asian Americans in society will begin.

Our theme - RUN: Roots, Unity, Now - will examine our structured beliefs of identity, belonging, assimilation, history, prejudice, and division. 

Roots: We cannot know ourselves today without knowing the history of our people. Our culture and identity is intertwined with where we came from, what we went through, and what we’ve done. We want to encourage young Asian Americans to learn and appreciate those who came before us and built the foundation we stand on today. 

Unity: The Asian American community has many points of conflict, such as ethnicity, religion, sexuality, etc. We will examine solutions to divisions in the community, what unity means, and whether true unity will ever exist. 

Now: Where are Asian Americans now? What are the issues that we face each day in the new millenium? We will focus on issues such as reproductive justice, political representation, Greek life, and more.

APAC will be held on April 11 - 12th.  Please contact Shaina Rae Sanchez or Juliet Shen at AlbanyAPAC2014@gmail.com with questions.

Join us for a talk on Growing Up in Transnational Worlds: A Comparative Look at Chinese and Dominican Americans, by Vivian Louie, on Friday, December 13, 2013, from 6pm to 8pm, at 25 West 43rd Street, 10th Floor, Room 1000, between 5th & 6th Avenues, Manhattan. This talk is free and open to the general public.
 Transnationalism refers to the phenomenon of immigrants maintaining connections to their country of origin, and employing a dual frame of reference to evaluate their experiences and outcomes in the country in which they have settled. How does transnationalism matter in the identities among the second generation, e.g., individuals who were born in the United States, or migrated by late childhood? In this presentation, Dr. Vivian Louie examines this question among second generation Dominicans and Chinese who have grown up in strong transnational fields and had parents who want them to participate in the homeland imaginary. The focus is on transnational orientations and/or practices among second generation individuals with particular attention to generational status, class, ethnicity, gender, and race.
 

Vivian Louie is the 2013-2014 CUNY Thomas Tam Visiting Professor at Hunter College. Dr. Louie received her Ph.D and M.A. from the Yale University Department of Sociology, M.A. from the Stanford University Department of Communication, and A.B. from Harvard University. She  has previously worked as a newspaper journalist, journalism teacher and youth magazine editor, and an associate professor in education and lecturer in sociology at Harvard. 

Dr. Louie studies immigration, education, and identities with a focus on the contrast between lived experience in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Dr.  Louie’s two books, Compelled to Excel: Immigration, Education, and Opportunity Among Chinese Americans(Stanford University Press, 2004) and Keeping the Immigrant Bargain: The Costs and Rewards of Success in America (Russell Sage Foundation, 2012), reveal how academic success is achieved in similar ways among working class Chinese, Dominicans and Colombians, even though they belong to groups typically framed at opposite ends of academic success (the Asian American high achiever and the Latino American low achiever). Dr. Louie is also an editor of and contributor to Writing Immigration: Scholars and Journalists in Dialogue (University of California Press, 2011).

 

To RSVP for this talk, please visit www.aaari.info/13-12-13Louie.htm. Please be prepared to present proper identification when entering the building lobby. Can’t attend? Watch the live webcast on our website homepage, starting at 6:15PM EST, or access the streaming video and audio podcast the following week.  

2014 is coming soon. For us immigrant folks, it means that our Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is set to expire and we’d need to renew our work authorizations… And what about our parents? Will Congress actually achieve something? In the very likely case of that not happening, I wanted to share an idea: Deferred Action for All (DAfA, if you will). Why? Well, here are five reasons.

1. Because we need to work.

5 Reasons Why Deferred Action Should Be for All      

Because undocumented immigrants contribute $15 billion dollars to Social Security in payroll taxes.

.

Because we want to feel safe driving

5 Reasons Why Deferred Action Should Be for All

Many of us live in mixed-status families, and we’re only one traffic violation away from being ripped apart from our families.

 

 

3. Because we don’t want to live in fear of deportations

5 Reasons Why Deferred Action Should Be for All      

With the constant threat of deportations through things like SB1070 and SComm, our communities, even the ones with legal status lie paralyzed from fear.

 

4. Because we want to come out of the shadows

5 Reasons Why Deferred Action Should Be for All      

It’s time for us to come out of the shadows of using someone else’s Social Security Card/Number so that we prove how much we contribute to our communities.

5. Because we can’t wait anymore

5 Reasons Why Deferred Action Should Be for All      

The congressional inaction on immigration reform makes us doubt whether there will be a pathway for legalization beyond us: our parents, friends who didn’t make the cutoff. we see Deferred Action for All as a solution for our communities.