“For the cost of this benefits package the city could give 4,385 students full, four-year scholarships to CUNY or hire 1,458 new teachers or pay for 350,000 GED test-prep programs or launch a micro-lending program for minority and women entrepreneurs.

“The EDC has not clearly justified why this much money should be used to subsidize this company. This subsidy seems to give away too much in exchange for the jobs and economic development it promises, despite the rosy numbers provided by the EDC.

khabacy:

ginanle:

Inspiring story of the day. It’s people like them that motivate me to teach. Education truly is the great equalizer. 

Love this.

Brilliant. The part that first got me was:

"They live in a quiet house. Their mother doesn’t speak English. The boys don’t understand much Vietnamese."

Imagining that disconnect kills me. And then I kept reading. Don’t mind me, I’m not tearing up…

erickao:

Should I have declined to self identify? 

  1. ASIAN-AMERICANS ARE NOT MAKING IT TO THE FORTUNE 500

    Asian-Americans are excelling in academics. In fact, they represent 15-25% of Ivy League enrollment. However, Asian-Americans make up less than 2% of Fortune 500 CEOs and corporate officers. It’s not clear how exactly this works out, as Asians are more likely to value power and compensation, aspire to top jobs, and speak up for a raise. Asians are simple less likely to get a raise or a promotion, and often, feel stalled professionally with less job satisfaction.

  2. ASIAN-AMERICANS ARE REACHING HIGHER LEVELS OF EMPLOYMENT, HOWEVER

    Asian-Americans enjoy good representation in entry-level and middle management positions, but somehow don’t make it to the top. Despite not filling out the Fortune 500, Asian-Americans still enjoy high achievement in employment, with 45% of Asian-Americans in management, professional, and related occupations, a figure that is higher than the total population, which comes in at 34%.

  3. NEARLY ALL ASIAN-AMERICANS HAVE AT LEAST A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

    Although certain groups still struggle with educational attainment, overall, Asians are completing high school in large numbers. About 86% of Asians in the U.S. 25 years and older have at least a high school diploma, and 50% of Asian-Americans have at least a bachelor’s degree. This is huge compared to the 28% of the total U.S. population with a bachelor’s degree.

  4. ASIAN KIDS JUST SPEND MORE TIME STUDYING

    In an exploration of Tiger Mother parenting, the New York Daily News discovered that the typically high achievement of Asian-Americans may not be due to harsh parenting, but rather, because they spend more time studying than other kids, and not necessarily because their parents force them to. In one study cited by the article, it was found that Asian-American 11th graders spent six more hours per week studying than white students of the same age. The article points out the extra study time can improve feelings of competence, self worth, and joy from completing a monumental task.

  5. ASIAN-AMERICAN KIDS AREN’T MORE STRESSED THAN THEIR PEERS

    Although high achievement and hard work are stressed by both parents and students in the Asian-American culture, studies have found that they typically don’t experience more stress than other groups. University of California, Irvine, psychology professor Chuansheng Chen studies almost 5,000 11th-grade math students and found that Asian-Americans and white Americans typically reported the same high level of stress. Asian-American students are, however, slightly more academically anxious. Still, Chen concluded that high parental standards and intense studying didn’t seem to cause noteworthy psychological stress.

  6. ASIAN-AMERICAN FAMILIES SIMPLY EARN MORE

    Asian-American families earn $15,600 more than the national median income for all households. But while Asian-Americans are doing well overall, there are larger numbers at the bottom of the scale as well. 10% of Asian-Americans live at the poverty level, and 2.2% of Asian-Americans live on public assistance, compared with 8.2% of Caucasians at the poverty level, and 1.3% of Caucasians on public assistance.

  7. ASIAN-AMERICANS TAKE UP A DISPROPORTIONATE SHARE OF THE NATION’S MOST PRESTIGIOUS UNIVERSITIES

    At some of the best universities in the United States, Asians are the biggest or one of the largest groups on campus. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the student body is 28% Asian-American, and the University of California at Berkeley is 39% Asian-American.

  8. ASIANS WITH A BACHELOR’S DEGREE WILL EARN $400K LESS OVER THEIR LIFETIME THAN CAUCASIANS

    Asian-American men are more likely to ask for a raise, but less likely to actually get one. Even with a bachelor’s degree, Asian-Americans will earn less than their Caucasian counterparts. In fact, according to Forbes, it adds up to a lot: $400k less over the course of a lifetime.

  9. ASIAN-AMERICAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER STUDENTS STRUGGLE WITH HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE COMPLETION

    Across the U.S., Asian-American and Pacific Islander students often have trouble completing their degrees, with issues in high school and college completion. In Hmong adolescents, 40% do not complete high school, almost half. In Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander groups, bachelor’s degrees are scarce, with only 14% of students achieving this goal, compared to 28% of Americans with a bachelor’s degree.

  10. OVERALL, ASIAN-AMERICANS ACHIEVE MORE COLLEGE DEGREES

    Although certain Asian-American groups may struggle with earning degrees, overall, Asian-Americans earn the highest college graduation rate. Asian-Americans have 65% college graduation rates, followed by whites at 59%. Additionally, Asian-Americans are the only racial group that does not have young men falling behind their predecessors in postsecondary attainment.

    1. NOT EVERY ASIAN GROUP IS DOING SO WELL

      Chinese-Americans and South Asians personify the high-achieving Asian stereotype most people have come to know, but there are other Asian-American groups who are struggling to make things work. According to Asian Nation, for every Chinese-American or South Asian with a college degree, there’s an equal number of Southeast Asians struggling to adapt to living in the U.S. Specifically, Vietnamese-Americans only have a college degree attainment rate of 20%, and Laotians, Cambodians, and Khmer have a rate less than 10%.

    2. SOME ASIAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS FACE SEVERE DISADVANTAGES

      Students from Southeast Asian countries like Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos come to the U.S. with issues that can impact their education, specifically war-related trauma and educational disruptions prior to immigration. While living in the U.S., many of these students deal with poverty, racism, and even limited access to educational resources, which can clearly put them at a severe disadvantage compared to other ethnic groups and even Asian-American families who have lived in the U.S. for multiple generations.

    3. THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP IS GETTING EVEN WIDER

      The gap between Asian-American students and everyone else is large and growing. Nationwide, Asian-Americans in the upper echelons of standard math exams were scoring 17 points higher than white students, and has widened in recent years according to the Center on Education Policy. Jack Jennings, president of the Center on Education Policy, remarks that other groups should learn a lesson from Asian-American students, who are “working harder, doing better, and getting ahead.”

    4. ASIAN-AMERICANS PERFORM WELL ON MATH SAT SECTIONS, BUT NOT AS WELL IN READING AND WRITING

      Asian-Americans typically do well on the SATs, and in the math section, Asian-Americans earned 42 more points than the average white student did. However, the same can not be said about the reading and writing section, with Asian-American students scoring seven points lower in writing, and 17 points lower in reading. This is perhaps due to language differences in families who have immigrated recently.

    5. SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDENTS ARE SOMETIMES MISDIAGNOSED AS LEARNING DISABLED

      Newly immigrated Southeast Asian students often have limited English proficiency, and as a result, some are misdiagnosed as “learning disabled” and placed in special education. Asian-American and Pacific Islander students are 1.24 times more likely to receive special education and related services than all other racial and ethnic groups combined.

    6. OFTEN, ASIAN STUDENTS ARE NOT PREPARED FOR COLLEGE-LEVEL COURSEWORK

      Asian-American students may be doing well overall, but often, they’re simply not ready for college. In California in particular, students are really struggling. The Education Trust published a study,Overlooked and Underserved: Debunking the Asian ‘Model Minority’ Myth in California Schools. In this study, researchers found that about 7 out of 10 Asian students and 9 out of 10 Pacific Islander students are not prepared for college-level coursework upon high school graduation. Further, less than 10% of Filipinos, Cambodians, Laotians, and Samoans are ready for college math.

    7. ASIAN-AMERICANS HAVE A HIGHER PER-CAPITA INCOME

      According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2008, Asian-Americans overall achieve a higher per-capita income than all other groups. Asian-Americans had per-capita incomes of $30,292, compared with whites, who had a per-capita income of $28,502, and blacks with a per-capita income of $18,406. This is likely due to the fact that Asian-Americans are well represented in management positions.

    8. WESTERN MOMS HAVE MUCH DIFFERENT IDEAS ABOUT EDUCATION THAN CHINESE IMMIGRANT MOMS DO

      There are certainly quantifiable differences between Chinese and Westerners when it comes to educational opinions, and that may shed light on why Asian-Americans seem to do so well in school. In one study, most Western mothers (70%) believed that “stressing academic success is not good for children” and that “parents need to foster the idea that learning is fun.” Chinese mothers feel completely different, with 0% of the Chinese moms responding positively to these statements. Rather, they believe that their children should be the best students, and that “academic achievement reflects successful parenting.”

    9. CHINESE KIDS SPEND MORE TIME STUDYING THAN PLAYING SPORTS

      Each day, Chinese parents spend about 10 times longer per day teaching and pushing children to engage in academic activities than their Western counterparts do. With this extra time, Western kids seem to spend it playing sports instead of studying.

    10. ASIAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS ARE ACHIEVING AT HIGH-POVERTY SCHOOLS

      Overall, Asian-American students are doing well and living up to their status as the “model minority.” Interestingly, 30% of Asian-American and Pacific Islander students attend high-poverty schools, meaning that they’re not just doing well, they’re doing well at schools that are chronically underfunded and lacking in resources that other schools may have to offer.

(Source: onlinecollege.org)

benjaminfang:

Fascinasians: How Ivy Leagues Avoid Diversity

fascinasians:

Back in March, as colleges began to herald their newly admitted classes for PR purposes, the Ivy League schools got to patting themselves on the back.

The Harvard Gazette bragged that Harvard’s newest batch of accepted students included record numbers of blacks and Latinos. Brown said its…

Finally being on a college campus and seeing “college diversity” for the first time, I realized how disappointed I felt about this. I always expected college to be a place where diversity and acceptance were prevalent, but I haven’t seen much of that yet. Instead, what I see is judgement, stereotyping, and condescension.

But maybe that’s my fault. I thought that college was a place where the old high school drama and semantics would be replaced by an honest eagerness to learn about other cultures, search for identity, and challenge preconceived notions about how the world works. I was and probably am still naive, and somehow dreamed up a hyper-romanticized idea about college. Now that the reality of it isn’t matching up with my vision, I am becoming increasingly uneasy about my next four years here.

Asians and Asian Americans make up the largest minority group here in my school, less than 10% of the entire student body. The school is largely white demographically, but it has the right intentions when it comes to diversity, or at least that’s what I think.

The public communications program I am a part of in my school is 35% male, and 21% people of color. 21%. In most of my classes, I see mostly white females occupying the seats in the classroom or lecture hall. Sometimes I think that I benefited from affirmative action because of the lack of people like me here in the program. And I think 21% is a rather pathetic number when talking about diversity in a college school. This needs to change.

(Source: GOOD)

Back in March, as colleges began to herald their newly admitted classes for PR purposes, the Ivy League schools got to patting themselves on the back.

The Harvard Gazette bragged that Harvard’s newest batch of accepted students included record numbers of blacks and Latinos. Brown said its admitted class was “the most racially … diverse“ in the school’s centuries-long history.  Dartmouth shared actual percentages, declaring that a full 44 percent of its newest class was composed of students of color. Coincidentally, that was the same percentage of minorities in Penn’s freshman class.

Numbers like these might lead someone to believe that diversity is no longer an issue at America’s most elite colleges. Like everyone else, students of color have long strived to make it to the Ivy League, where the education and connections can set a person up for life. Now, evidently, huge numbers of minorities are getting their chance. When nearly half of an Ivy League school’s accepted class is made up of people of color—America as a whole is only 47 percent non-white (PDF)—aren’t we nearing perfect equality? If only.

It turns out the Ivy League’s racial diversity stats are only half the story. People in search of egalitarianism at places like Harvard and Columbia shouldn’t just be asking what color students are, but where they’re from, too.

Call it the Ivy League’s dirty little secret: While America’s most elite colleges do in fact make it a point to promote ethnic diversity on their campuses, a lot of them do so by admitting hugely disproportionate numbers of wealthy immigrants and their children rather than black students with deep roots—and troubled histories—in the United States.

The problem, of course, isn’t that black immigrants are going to Ivy League schools in large numbers; educational success should be applauded no matter where the student is from. But the large numbers of African immigrants on American college campuses, coupled with the remarkably small numbers of native blacks on those same campuses, calls into question the effectiveness of America’s affirmative action programs. While affirmative action started as a system to right the wrongs of slavery and institutional anti-black racism, helping wealthy immigrants who weren’t here for those struggles doesn’t serve any of the program’s original intentions.

“Very few black students [at Harvard] were able to be categorized under the term ‘just black,’” says Joy Alison Cooper. Cooper graduated from Harvard in 2006 and is now a Fogarty Scholar doing clinical research in Nairobi, Kenya. “There was an overrepresentation of Africans,” she says, “and specifically Nigerians. Nigerians were so numerous that in my senior year, my best friend helped start the Nigerian Students Association.”

The statistics are striking: Though African immigrants, many of them from Nigeria and Ghana, make up less than 1 percent of America’s total population, first- and second-generation black immigrants comprise 41 percent of all black students at Ivy League schools, according to 2007 research from teams at Princeton and Penn. Another study, this one published in Sociology of Education in 2009, found that immigrant blacks attended select colleges at almost four times the rate of native-born African Americans. Outside of the Ivy League, almost 44 percent of African immigrants graduated from a four-year college, compared to just 18 percent of native blacks.

None of this would matter if black Americans and their immigrant counterparts were gunning for the Ivies from a level playing field. But they’re not. Data shows that African immigrants, Nigerians in particular, are far wealthier and more highly educated than many Americans of any race. In 2000, when the median household income for African Americans was about $30,000, the median income for Nigerian immigrant families was more than $45,000 (PDF). Where education is concerned, in 2007,African immigrants were likelier to have obtained a college or graduate degree than any other immigrant population, and 20 percent likelier than the U.S. population as a whole.

It’s easy to chalk these numbers up to the myth that immigrants work harder than native blacks, but studies say that’s wrong. According to the aforementioned sociological research from 2009, immigrant students don’t value education more than native blacks or perform significantly better academically. Rather, they have the financial resources required to get a leg-up into the highest echelons of academia.

“When we compare immigrant blacks to African Americans from similar family socioeconomic backgrounds, we find no significant differences between them in their chances of attending college,” says Pamela Bennett, one of the study’s authors and an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins. “Our findings indicate that [African immigrants] have greater resources, in the form of family structure and private school attendance, that are universally helpful in providing opportunities to go to college.” (“Family structure” means that African immigrants are less likely to live in single-parent households than native blacks.)

Teresa Wiltz, senior editor of black politics and culture website The Root, graduated from Dartmouth in the 1980s. She says that a lot of her black peers did benefit from programs helping low-income minorities, but the African immigrants with whom she went to school were very affluent. “There was a group of Ethiopian students there, two of whom were the relatives of [Ethiopian Emperor] Haile Selassie,” she tells me. “Yes, they came from highly privileged backgrounds, but they were also exiles thanks to the revolution there. There was also a group of Ghanaian students—all men.”

Emails and phone calls to Brown, Yale, and Princeton requesting interviews about their admissions processes went unanswered. Emails to members and former members of Harvard’s Nigerian Student’s Association also went unanswered. Harvard senior communications officer Jeff Neal wrote in an email, “Harvard College seeks to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible, regardless of individual background. … There are no quotas of any kind. We rely on teachers, counselors, headmasters, and alumni to share information with us about applicants’ strength of character, their ability to overcome adversity, and other personal qualities—all of which play a part in admissions decisions.”

In his book The Trouble With Diversity: How We Learned to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality, University of Illinois at Chicago English professor Walter Benn Michaels laments that colleges have abandoned real affirmative action programs in order to promote a more general sense of diversity, which presumes that all black people are alike regardless of income or place of birth. “The trouble with diversity … is not just that it won’t solve the problem of economic inequality,” he writes, “it’s that it makes it hard for us to even see the problem.”

For her part, Cooper, the Harvard graduate, says what she observed in black immigrant students wasn’t more smarts or a lot more money, but a will to succeed that hadn’t been quashed by decades of oppression. “Descendants of slaves came here on a ship as chattel, not on a plane or inner tube with hopes of an American dream,” she says. “Honestly, I believe it’s difficult to strive for better when you already live in what people name the American dream, but what you have lived is a nightmare.”

photo via (cc) Flickr user Patricia Drury

(Source: GOOD)

welcome to one admissions!

This is One Admissions, a service dedicated to helping high school students obtain an edge in the competitive college application process. Having just recently graduated ourselves, we know that the college application process can be one of the most stressful periods of your high school career. Selecting the place where you will begin your new life is difficult. It is more than just picking a name off a list or applying to wherever your best friends are going, it is about determining the school that will satisfy your needs and interests. This process is about finding where you belong.